End of Life

End of Life

End of Life is actually a verb in the tech industry. To end-of-life a product or program is to willingly orchestrate its demise. In this ongoing and growing project, I gather cardboard from items shipped to me from my Internet orders and transform them into quasi replicas of obsolete technologies (the models are generally not specific, but rather pulled from a new collective memory of gadgetry of yore.)

This fake tech is almost a pile of effigies, while the pile is almost a pyre, illustrating a sort of complete cycle on different levels. The shipping boxes deconstructed and used to depict the technology are a portrait of the very system used to initiate their journey to my door and to my recycle bin while the electronics they represent are themselves also eventually junkpiled as we gather their newer iterations and begin the cycle anew. 

End of Life

End of Life

Phones in progress,

Cardboard, acetate, paint

End of Life

End of Life

Fresh Direct Computer (in progress)

Cardboard

End of Life

End of Life

Computers in progress

Cardboard, acetate, paint

Cardboard Roses

Cardboard Roses

Hundreds of handmade painted cardboard roses.

Cardboard Roses

Cardboard Roses

Process

Cardboard Roses

Cardboard Roses

Process

Cardboard Roses

Cardboard Roses

Detail

U

U

This piece was for a show at Wayfarers Brooklyn where each artist was given a word from a ransom letter to depict. My word was, "U", the frequent electronic timesaving version of, "you".

I started thinking about how this abbreviation seems so much less romantic than its pre-amputated self. "You" is almost lyrical to look at and a joy to scribe. "U", by comparison, seems almost abrupt, gutterral.

I decided to give post-op "U" the Romantic Treatment, depicting it almost as a Victorian valentine, But, I suppose as a joke, I decided to let "U" retain its digital-age identity beyond its spelling. I created it from the least romantic gift box possible: the ubiquitous Amazon box.

U

U

Sideview

Secret Self for Beasticon

Secret Self for Beasticon

Mark Miller Gallery, Lower East Side, NYC, 2014

This window installation was made with a paper mache armature. The "fur" was made from 25 shredded Fresh Direct boxes.  Interestingly, the quality of the cardboard from this New York online grocery service is the best for this type of work. The consistency of the pulp is soft and maleable.

 

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

Papier-mâché base of newspaper and flour-water paste

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

(From behind) 

72 inches high, cardboard, paint, glue

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

Secret Self (Work in Progress)

(Front) 

72 inches high, cardboard, paint, glue

ArtShop Sign for Governors Island Art Fair Pop-up

ArtShop Sign for Governors Island Art Fair Pop-up

The challenge for this sign (and the ArtShop) was that I needed to create something with little to no art materials on Governors Island. With lots of scavenging and a little glue, this was the result.

Cash Register WIP for Governors Island Art Fair Pop-up

Cash Register WIP for Governors Island Art Fair Pop-up

This fake cash register was something of a little joke. Like everything "pop-up" these days, we simply used tiny card readers in our ArtShop on Governors Island.

Completed Cardboard Cash Register

Completed Cardboard Cash Register

Cardboard, glue, paint